Feng Shui & Water

ch4

 Water is an essential component in feng shui. In fact, the words, “feng shui” mean “wind and water” in Chinese. Wind and Water represent the fundamental concept in feng shui of flow and balance through time. If you notice water flowing through a streambed, you’ll see the water move around rocks and reeds, and go on it’s way. Too much water, and there is flooding and devastation, too little water, and the water becomes foul and stagnant. Water is a wonderful metaphor for the balance, grace, and movement of feng shui.

     We all know that water is necessary for life. We must have water to survive, and our bodies are hard-wired to respond positively to proximity to water. Think about it this way, a home with a water view (a lake, the ocean, a river, etc.) will usually cost more, sometimes much more, than an identical home with no water view.  Homes that are located in close proximity are also usually more expensive than identical homes that aren’t. The higher cost of the home with the water view or closeness to water is a direct reflection of the high value we place on water. It’s as if our survival instinct sees water (whether salt or fresh water) and says, “Water…Good”.

 One of the most common questions I’m asked by clients is, “Where should I locate my pool, spa, koi pond, etc.?” In feng shui,

there are specific guidelines on where to locate water. Water is one of the five elements used to stimulate the nine meridian points in a building. These points are associated with life aspiration qualities such as wealth, career, love, etc. By placing the proper element as close to the meridian point as possible, the energy of that point is released, much like acupuncture needles are used to unblock stuck energy in the human body.

     The element water is used to stimulate the flow of energy on the north meridian point in a building. The energy associated with this meridian pertains to Career. Therefore, to stimulate the Career meridian point, you will want to find the northernmost point in your home and if possible, place a water feature (a fountain,  or an aquarium indoors, and items such as a pool, birdbath, spa, etc. outdoors) on this point. If you don’t know how to accurately determine the meridian points, pick up a copy of my book, Feng Shui that Makes Sense for exact directions on how to do this.
     Ideally, the water should be flowing 24/7, so a tabletop fountain is perfect for bringing moving water indoors, and an outdoor fountain can be a wonderful enhancement in the yard or on a patio; just remember to keep water in it! For an indoor fountain, use distilled water to keep mineral deposits from building up. However, if your pet drinks out of the fountain (like my cat does), then use filtered drinking water. You’ll get some mineral deposits, but distilled water is not healthy for animals to drink, so don’t use it if your cat or dog likes to drink the fountain water.
    When you first get your fountain, take it to the kitchen sink, remove the pump from the fountain and look for a lever on the pump. This lever regulates the flow of water. Turn the lever to the lowest setting, put the pump back in the fountain, fill it with water (while you’re at the sink), then turn it on. This way you can adjust the flow of water without it spraying all over your furniture.
   If you do choose to place a fountain on the northern point in your home, try to choose one with very little stone or rock, as earth (stone, cement, rock, etc.) is undesirable in this area. If you are using water in other areas of the home (see below), earth is fine on the fountain, you just want to avoid that on a fountain that you place in the north.
    An aquarium will also work as a water feature on the north meridian point. Be sure to keep it clean and healthy. If you have a bathroom on the northern point, using the tub or shower daily is enough to bring moving water to this point, but you can still add a fountain in there if you want to.
     To stimulate Career energy in the north, the indoor point is the most important one to enhance, but water can also be added outside to help bring more energy into this area. Outdoors, pools, spas, ponds, etc. are great when located in the north.
    While the water element is the main element for the north (Career) point, there are other places where it is compatible. Water features can be used (along with healthy plants) on the east (Family) and the southeast (Wealth) points to give those points an extra boost. Water is neutral in the southwest (Love), northeast (Knowledge), and center (Health). Water should be minimized in the west (Creativity) and in the northwest (Synchronicity) because it is the element that weakens these points. Water is especially undesirable in the south (Fame and Reputation)  as the main element for the south is fire and water is energetically the destructive element for fire. Again, you only need to avoid too much earth (stone, rock, etc.) on the fountain if it is being placed in the north. Fountains with stone are fine in the other areas so if you have a fountain with a lot of stone that you just love, use it in the E, SE, NE, SW, or center and get one that doesn’t have much stone (glass, metal , resin, and plastic are OK) for the north.
    Water is precious and human beings have an instinctive attraction to it. It’s negative ions and gentle sounds soothe us, swimming and bathing in it refreshes us, and drinking it keeps us healthy and alive. Water has been an essential part of feng shui for over 5,000 years. When we add water features to our indoor and outdoor spaces, we are adding something that we as humans relate to in a very profound way. We not only have a physical relationship with water, but an emotional relationship to it as well (think of how many billions of dollars are spent every year just to vacation near water). Water affects our bodies, minds, and spirits, and when placed properly, can affect aspects of our lives.
Copyright protected c. 2014 Cathleen McCandless  www.sandiegofengshui.com

Copyright protected c. 2014 Cathleen McCandless http://www.sandiegofengshui.com

Copyright 2014, Cathleen McCandless, All Rights Reserved

 

Advertisements

Comments are closed.